Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Atlanta Falcons Honor Fallen Police Officer Gail Thomas

From L to R: Craig W. Floyd, Chairman & CEO of the NLEOMF; Arthur Blank, Owner of the Atlanta Falcons; Jasmine Sherman, daughter of Officer Gail Thomas; and The Honorable George Turner, Chief of the Atlanta Police Department.
This past Sunday, December 16, Memorial Fund Chairman & CEO Craig W. Floyd joined Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank on the field before their game versus the New York Giants. Accompanied by Chief George Turner, they presented Jasmine Sherman with a special Recorded Memorial Tribute in honor of her mother, Atlanta Police Officer Gail Thomas, who was struck and killed on January 24, 2012.

Launched in the summer of 2012, the Recorded Memorial Tribute Program is designed to share the stories of law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. The program provides a special way for all citizens to honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

Now, thanks to the Atlanta Falcons, Officer Gail Thomas will forever be remembered for her infectious smile and devotion to policing in this touching tribute. Watch the full Recorded Memorial Tribute.

Special thanks to Bob McDonough, Chief Security Officer of the Atlanta Falcons, and Bill McClain, Chief Security Officer for Home Depot, Inc. for coordinating this presentation, and to the Atlanta Falcons for sponsoring the creation of Officer Gail Thomas’s Recorded Memorial Tribute.

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador & Guardian Spotlight: Bill Erfurth

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving our goals.


A relatively new member of the Ambassador group, many of you have probably never heard the name Bill Erfurth before. Though new to us, he’s been part of the law enforcement community for decades. Bill is a career law enforcement professional who served for over 25 years in Miami, Florida. In past years, Bill had his own radio show (COPNET), on which he, along with Memorial Fund Chairman & CEO Craig Floyd and now-U.S. Marshall Bill Berger discussed many issues of importance to law enforcement, especially officer safety. 


Lately, Bill has taken his talents behind the camera, and in partnership with the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, he and his production team (Modern City Entertainment) have produced an exceptional documentary, Heroes Behind the Badge. Just like most newsworthy topics in the media these days, the repercussions of a law enforcement line-of-duty death appear to end with the start of the next news cycle. This is not so for our law enforcement families. Heroes Behind the Badge takes a close-up and personal look at several officers and incidents in which they were involved in 2011—some fatal, others close calls. In documentary style, law enforcement professionals and family members share their stories of loss, grief and survival. The film does not reenact the incidents, but describes them with eyewitness accounts. Families share their deepest thoughts and their journey to Washington, DC for National Police Week and the Candlelight Vigil at the Memorial.  

All Ambassadors and Guardian volunteers are encouraged to consider hosting a screening of Heroes Behind the Badge in your local community. Several screenings have been held in communities across the country. To learn more about Heroes Behind the Badge and how to host a screening, please e-mail Bill Erfurth or visit the Heroes Behind the Badge website

We thank Bill for his leadership and vision to tell the stories of the brave men and women of law enforcement. 

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Distinguished Service Award Given to FBI Director Robert S. Mueller

The Honorable Robert S. Mueller, III, Director of the FBI, was unanimously selected by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Board of Directors to receive our Distinguished Service Award in 2012.  Our Board of Directors includes 16 of our nation's leading law enforcement groups, representing virtually every federal, state and local officer in America.
From L to R:
Harry Phillips, Craig W. Floyd, Director Robert S. Mueller III,
Suzie Sawyer, and Michael Muth

The  Memorial Fund's Distinguished Service Award is presented annually to "an individual or organization that has made an exceptional and lasting contribution to the law enforcement profession." Director Mueller will be joining a very impressive list of past winners of this award, which has been given since 1996.

As head of the FBI,  Director Mueller has made many contributions to keep America safe and to support the mission of the Memorial Fund. Director Mueller's exceptional and transformational leadership of the FBI has helped to ensure that there have been no successful terrorist attacks on U.S. soil since 9/11.  His regular participation in the Memorial Fund 's annual Candlelight Vigil and other major events has demonstrated a deep concern for those officers who have been killed in the line of duty, and their families, especially for the eight FBI Special  Agents who have sacrificed their lives during Director Mueller's tenure in office. The FBI's Office for Victim Assistance and the Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted Report are other excellent examples of the strong commitment that Director Mueller and the FBI have made to support crime victims and to promote law enforcement safety.

The Distinguished Service Award is the best way we know how to recognize his many contributions to the law enforcement profession and to say thank you to Director Mueller.

Prior Distinguished Service Award winners:
2011: Dick Wolf
2010: Target
2009: Vice President Joe Biden
2008: Congressman Steny Hoyer, House Majority Leader
2007: Cynthia Brown, American Police Beat Publisher
2006: President Bill Clinton
2005: Motorola
2004: Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell
2003: Police Unity Tour
2002: President George H.W. Bush
2001: United States Mint Police
2000: U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno
1999: John Walsh, Host of America's Most Wanted
1998: Congressman (ret.) Mario Biaggi, Founder of the Memorial Fund
1997: The DuPont Company
1996: Senator Claiborne Pell, Honorary Chairman of the Memorial Fund

Thursday, November 15, 2012

National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Golf Classic

Last week at Legends Resort in Myrtle Beach, SC, the 13th Annual National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Golf Classic raised $35,000 for the Memorial Fund. Dubbed the "WORLD'S LARGEST LAW ENFORCEMENT GOLF EVENT,” golfers enjoyed five days of competition.

The record $35,000 donation brings the total amount of funds raised from the event to over $500,000. The overall top male and female winners at this year’s event were Adam Argenbright and Vicki Dawson.

Special thanks to event organizer, Dan Morphet, whose hard work makes this event possible. Also, thanks go to DynCorp International for serving as top sponsor.

For more details about the event, please visit: http://www.nleomgc.com

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Honoring America's Military Heroes

Today, at exactly 11 am, a color guard, made up of members from each of the military services, will stand watch during the annual Veteran’s Day ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery.

Just a few miles away stands the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, the national monument to law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty—including military police officers.

The parallels drawn between military and law enforcement service are vast and the line between them is often blurred. Both are fighting a war—with our military fighting overseas and our law enforcement often fighting the war on crime domestically. Both professions require courage and bravery—and breed American heroes.

Many veterans turn to policing when they come home. Many law enforcement officers are military reservists. When it comes to helping others in need and securing cherished freedoms, the location of the war or the type of service is not what’s important to our men and women in uniform.

This Veteran's Day, leave a tribute to recognize all the heroic and selfless contributions military and law enforcement officers make each day to protect our country and ensure our freedom.

As long as these men and women are willing to put their lives at risk for our country, there is indeed great hope for our future.

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador & Guardian Spotlight: Richard Belzer

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving our goals.


This month we spotlight an old friend who is more than just a member of the Museum’s National Honorary Campaign Committee. He is someone who truly admires and respects the men and women who serve our communities every day. All the Law & Order fans out there probably know him as Detective John Munch, the fictional character who has appeared on more episodes of a television show than any other police character throughout history. But Richard Belzer is also a true friend and supporter of the men and women who serve as public safety officials. 

For over 10 years, Richard has supported the Memorial Fund, participating in our events and even speaking on Capitol Hill in support of officer safety. This year, Richard once again emceed the National Law Enforcement Museum Gala on October 12. 

Though most are familiar with his acting career, some people don’t know that Richard is also an author. His past books include How to be a Stand-up Comic, I am Not a Psychic!, and of course, I am Not a Cop!

His latest book, Dead Wrong: Straight Facts on the Country's Most Controversial Cover-Ups, is now available at bookstores and online. If you know anything about Richard Belzer, then you know he loves a great conspiracy. His latest work is an entertaining read that claims to provide facts on many reported cover-ups. We will let you be the judge. 

Please join us in thanking Richard Belzer for being a loyal friend and supporter of law enforcement! We are honored to be able to work with him and appreciate him taking time from his busy schedule to be with us. To learn more about Richard Belzer, visit his website: www.ibelz.com.  

Friday, October 26, 2012

Happy 95th Birthday, Congressman Biaggi!

Today, the founder of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, U.S. Rep. Mario Biaggi (ret.), celebrates his 95th birthday.

In 1960, then Lieutenant Biaggi received the New York City Police Medal of Honor for Valor, the Department's highest award (pictured above).


Here are just a few more highlights from former Congressman Biaggi's impressive career.

  • Served for 23 years as New York City police officer, retiring in 1965 as a Detective Lieutenant.
  • Wounded 10 times in the line of duty, and when he retired in 1965, he was the most decorated officer in New York City history.
  • Went on to serve 20 years in the U.S. House of Representatives.
  • Authored the law to establish the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, among many other legislative accomplishments.
  • Founded the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund in 1984.

Join us in wishing Mr. Biaggi the best on his 95th birthday.



Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Second Annual Ride & Run to Remember

Thank you to all riders, runners, volunteers, virtual participants, and supporters!

Thanks for making the 2012 event a great success!

This just in...


More Ride & Run stats

Check out the current fundraising amounts and participant numbers.

Fundraising

  • $114,106 donations to participants
  • $137,210 total donations
  • $40,000 from sponsorships
  • $177,210 total raised

Total Registrants

  • 347 riders
  • 309 runners
  • 656 total
  • 110 volunteers
  • 53 virtual participants

Friday, September 28, 2012

Law Enforcement Guardian Spotlight: Stuart & Lisa Levine

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving our goals.


Stuart & Lisa Levine
Please join me in thanking Stuart & Lisa Levine for their dedication to the law enforcement profession and their continued support for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.

This month we are proud to recognize Stuart & Lisa Levine of Long Island, New York. Stuart is a former West Palm Beach (FL) Deputy Sheriff who is now the owner of the Zellman Group, a firm established on a deep foundation in loss prevention, audit, and retail and food & beverage operations. On April 24, 2012 Stuart and Lisa hosted “Honor at the Castle,” a gala at the OHEKA Castle in Huntington, NY. The event was emceed by Royal Pains star Mark Feuerstein and honored fallen ATF Special Agent John Capano. It was a huge success, attended by over 250 supporters and officers from the New York and New Jersey area.  

Stuart & Lisa support the Memorial Fund and Museum by participating in many of our events. They joined us at the New York Mets, New York Liberty, and New York Islanders Law Enforcement Appreciation Events over the past several months. The Levines also introduced up-and-coming recording artist “Range” to the Memorial Fund. Range recently wrote and recorded Lay it Down, a tribute to law enforcement officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice. Lay it Down is available on iTunes and Range has agreed to donate proceeds from the song to the Museum campaign.  

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Trooper Side Swiped by Tractor-trailer

This past June, Maryland State Trooper David Avila was making a routine traffic stop along Interstate 70 in Washington County, MD. Suddenly, the dashcam inside his vehicle captured a tractor-trailer side swiping Trooper Avila and his vehicle.

Trooper Avila was lucky to survive and is currently undergoing physical therapy for his injuries. “Sometimes I look at it, and it just doesn’t seem like there’s light at the end of the tunnel,” he said. “But I’m able to walk and doing a lot of physical therapy to get back.”



Throughout history, more than 5,000 law enforcement officers have died in the line of duty in traffic-related incidents, including automobile, motorcycle and bicycle crashes, as well as instances in which officers were struck and killed by another vehicle while they were outside their patrol vehicles.

Here are a few easy steps you can take to make our roadways safer for officers and others, and to help decrease officer injuries and fatalities. Please remember these every time you're out on the road. Do your part to keep our peace officers safe.

  1. Give officers room on the roadway. When you see or hear a police or other emergency vehicle with its lights and siren activated, slow down, move to the right and stop if possible. Once the emergency vehicle passes, do not follow the vehicle too closely - give it plenty of room.

  2. Move over. When see you a police or other emergency vehicle stopped on the side of the roadway, slow down and, if possible, safely move one additional lane away from the stop. Forty-eight states have now enacted so-called "Move Over" laws, and violators can be ticketed.

  3. Never drive on the shoulder of a highway. This is not only illegal but also dangerous, as police and other emergency vehicles often use the shoulder to get to traffic crashes and other incidents.
Sources:
http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Video-A-State-Trooper-Gets-Sideswiped-By-a-Tractor-Trailer-168932506.html
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2012/09/07/tractor-trailer-hits-trooper.hln 

This blog is part of a series highlighting the risks law enforcement officers face on the road, as part of  an innovative partnership  with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to promote law enforcement officer safety on the roadways.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

We Will Never Forget the Law Enforcement Heroes of 9/11



Today, at an intimate gathering held at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC, Memorial Fund staff and friends honored the 72 American peace officers killed tragically on September 11, 2001.

Memorial Fund Chairman & CEO Craig Floyd welcomed guests and shared some personal remembrances of that tragic day 11 years ago. Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr. delivered some remarks before leading in reading the names of all 72 officers killed on the deadliest day in law enforcement history.

"These heroic men and women answered the highest calling of their profession, placing the safety of others above their own,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “Put simply, their selfless actions saved countless lives. And—especially this morning—as we lift up their stories, we also reaffirm the values that have always been the hallmark of America's law enforcement community, and honor the contributions—and the ongoing work—of those who give so much to keep us safe.”

Here are two articles that reflect on the tragic events of 9/11, written by Memorial Fund Chairman & CEO Craig W. Floyd. These articles were published in American Police Beat Magazine, one month after the attacks, and one year later, respectively:

Reflections from "Ground Zero," October 1, 2001
9/11: A Year Later, August 27, 2002

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador Spotlight: Chris and Erin Shoppmeyer

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.

This month we recognize two Ambassadors for their work to honor America’s law enforcement professionals. Chris Shoppmeyer and his daughter Erin love the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and have dedicated many hours to supporting and attending our Law Enforcement Appreciation events. Chris is a federal law enforcement agent who works for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as a Conservation Agent, and Erin works for the National Park Service as a Ranger at the Statue of Liberty.

Father and daughter, Chris and Erin Shoppmeyer

Chris and Erin worked closely with the Memorial Fund staff to set up a meeting with Major League Baseball’s Boston Red Sox. As a result of their efforts, the Red Sox hosted a great Law Enforcement Appreciation Night on August 2nd that honored all of New England’s fallen officers and had over 700 law enforcement officers and supporters in attendance. On August 7, Chris and Erin joined a group of Ambassadors and the Memorial Fund’s Director of Development & Law Enforcement Relations, John Shanks, at Citi Field as the Law Enforcement Ambassador program was honored by the New York Mets with the Mets Spirit Award.

A special thank you goes out to Chris and Erin Shoppmeyer, a true law enforcement family and exceptional supporters of the Memorial Fund.

To learn how you, too, can become a volunteer or help set up a Law Enforcement Appreciation event in your city, contact Tyler Gately at TGately@nleomf.org or 202-737-8539.

Friday, August 10, 2012

NY Mets Present Spirit Award to Memorial Fund Ambassadors & Guardians

In a pre-game ceremony on August 7, 2012, the New York Mets invited members of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund’s Ambassador & Guardian Program onto the field to receive the Mets Spirit Award.  Memorial Fund Director of Development & Law Enforcement Relations, John Shanks, accepted the award on behalf of all Law Enforcement Ambassadors & Guardians, volunteer leaders who work tirelessly to honor and support the law enforcement community. During the presentation, John Shanks was joined by Memorial Fund Law Enforcement Relations Associate, Tyler Gately, as well as Memorial Fund Ambassadors Brent Clark, Stuart and Lisa Levine, Chris and Erin Shoppmeyer, Pat Kissane, and Greg Williams.


The August 7th match-up between the NY Mets and Miami Marlins was designated as Law Enforcement Appreciation Night, and more than 500 law enforcement officers and their families were in attendance.  The New York Police Department Honor Guard presented the colors at the opening ceremony.

The Memorial Fund relies on volunteer leaders who help organize and promote Law Enforcement Appreciation Events like this one—many at sporting venues throughout America. A full schedule of Law Enforcement Appreciation Events is available at www.LawMemorial.org/Sports.

A special thanks to Brent Clark, a Memorial Fund Ambassador from New York, who was instrumental in working with the NY Mets to organize this event, along with Stuart and Lisa Levine, who brought a large group from their company, The Zellman Group. Stuart also arranged for recording artist Range to perform his single “Lay it Down,” a tribute to fallen law enforcement officers. Range is generously donating the full proceeds of his song to the Memorial Fund. It is available to download in the iTunes store.

To learn more about how you can become a Law Enforcement Ambassador or Guardian, visit http://www.nleomf.org/contribute/ambassadors/ or contact Tyler Gately, Law Enforcement Relations Associate, at TGately@nleomf.org or 202.737.8539.

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Boston Red Sox Salute Law Enforcement at Fenway Park

For two straight games—on August 1st v. the Detroit Tigers and on August 2nd v. the Minnesota Twins—the Boston Red Sox honored law enforcement officers from around the region with Law Enforcement Appreciation Nights at Fenway Park.

Before the August 2nd game, law enforcement officers—including Boston Police Deputy Superintendent William Gross, surviving family members of officers killed in the line of duty, and representatives from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund—stepped onto the field for a pre-game ceremony, to honor the following officers killed in 2012 from the New England region:
  • Police Officer Kevin Ambrose, Springfield (MA) Police Department
  • Police Chief Michael P. Maloney, Greenland (NH) Police Department
  • Deputy Sheriff Ryan Tvelia, Norfolk County (MA) Sheriff's Office
  • Police Officer Jose Torres, Westfield (MA) Police Department
  • Sergeant Maxwell Dorley, Providence (RI) Police Department
  • Detective Andrew F. Faggio, New Haven (CT) Police Department
The Memorial Fund's July 1998 Officer of the Month, Officer Tommy Griffiths of the Boston (MA) Police Department, and Memorial Fund Law Enforcement Ambassador, Gates (NY) Police Officer Joshua Bowman, were in attendance at the game.

Law Enforcement Appreciation sporting events are designed to honor law enforcement officers and pay tribute to those who have died in the line of duty. A full schedule of events is available at www.LawMemorial.org/Sports.

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Honoring Penn Hills (PA) Police Officer Michael J. Crawshaw

Officer Michael J. Crawshaw
The following blog was written by Joseph E Derouin, friend of Officer Michael J. Crawshaw.

On December 6th, 2009, Penn Hills (PA) Police Officer Michael J. Crawshaw, tragically lost his life responding to a “shots fired” call in a suburb just east of Pittsburgh. When arriving at the scene, the gunman cowardly fired into the windshield of Mike’s radio car before Mike had a chance to exit.  Mike was ambushed with no opportunity to defend himself.

Mike was one of my closest friends and has been so since we were kids.  Mike was a very special young man.  He was an incredible son, grandson, brother, uncle and friend.  He loved life and the people around him even more.  He was dependable, caring and honest. 

Mike was everything that we should respect in a human being. 

Needless to say, Mike’s death was devastating.  As a friend, not only did I have to deal with the grief of losing someone I cared about so deeply but I also had to witness his family suffer through unimaginable pain as a result of this tragedy.  A family that absolutely did not deserve the fate they were handed that cold December night.

The day after Mike’s funeral, all of Mike’s closest childhood friends met at Mike’s grave and decided to do whatever it takes to make sure Mike’s memory and, equally as important, Mike’s family never be forgotten.  One of our first ideas was to petition Shaler Township, the town we grew up in, to rename a park or a field after Mike.  We chose a baseball field located in the heart of the town and presented our idea to the Shaler Township Board of Commissioners.  Unanimously, they agreed and Michael J. Crawshaw Memorial Field became the new name of the field we played baseball on as children.  Furthermore, we created the Michael J. Crawshaw Memorial Fund.  The objective of the fund was fund the construction of a permanent memorial in Mike’s name at the baseball field.

After two years of fundraising and with the support of hundreds of volunteers and donors, our dream came true on April 14th, 2012.  With the support of Shaler Township, we unveiled a large memorial that stands behind the players benches at the field.  Carved into the front of the memorial is three pictures of Mike; one of him in his little league uniform, one in his high football uniform and a picture of Mike as an adult.  The wording on the front speaks to why Mike deserves to always be remembered for his act of bravery and the back is a reminder that Mike is always with us, no matter where our lives shall take us.
The Memorial Fund will continue on in Mike’s name, with proceeds helping to create better and safer fields for kids to play on as well as continuing to provide support to various youth initiatives throughout our hometown. The last two years have been difficult to say the least but it has also allowed me to see the truly best in people.  People who have made major sacrifices to help the idea of a memorial become reality.  The memorial not only stands for a great young man who we lost way too early, it also symbolizes the love and passion for him that was shared by so many people.

More information about the Officer Michael J. Crawshaw Memorial Fund is available at: http://www.facebook.com/crawshaw.memorial.fund.

The Dangers Law Enforcement Officers Face on the Roadways

On average, 72 officers died from traffic-related incidents(automobile crashes, motorcycle crashes, struck while outside their vehicles, & train crashes) each year during 2000-2010. But law enforcement officers face a variety of other safety hazards while on our roads and highways.

Recently, CNN featured a dramatic video taken from the dashboard cam of Fortville (IN) Officer Matt Fox highlighting this potential danger. Officer Fox had noticed a vehicle with a missing taillight and was conducting a routine traffic stop when suddenly the suspect flees, with Officer Fox in pursuit. The video shows the suspect suddenly stop, immediately exit his vehicle and deliver several shots directly at Officer Fox's vehicle.

 
Officer Fox was struck in the hand, forehead, and chest. He was recently released from the Indianapolis Hospital and is in rehabilitation, with a long road to recovery ahead of him.
Officer Fox is lucky to have survived. Tragically, in 2011, there were 11 officers shot and killed—including two officers that were ambushed in unprovoked attacks—while driving or conducting routine traffic stops, in similar situations as Officer Fox.

More information about Officer Fox’s condition and the recovery is available at:
http://www.indystar.com/article/20120802/NEWS/120802062/Wounded-Fortville-police-officer-Matt-Fox-s-friends-colleagues-join-get-well-group-photo     
http://www.wibc.com/news/Story.aspx?ID=1750075

This blog is part of a series highlighting the risks law enforcement officers face on the road, as part of  an innovative partnership  with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to promote law enforcement officer safety on the roadways.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador Spotlight: Carl R. Peed

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.

This month we recognize Carl R. Peed, a long-time supporter of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and the National Law Enforcement Museum. Even before the Museum capital campaign began, Carl supported our work and contributed efforts to honoring law enforcement. Through Carl’s leadership and vision, he helps identify individuals and companies that the Memorial Fund staff can contact to help raise awareness and funds for our mission.

Carl R. Peed
Carl has a long, respected career in law enforcement and criminal justice. He founded CP2, a Virginia consulting company, after retiring as director of the U.S. Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), which he was appointed to by Attorney General John Ashcroft in 2001. At COPS, he managed the organization that supports state and local law enforcement nationwide.

Prior to COPS, he served as the Director of Juvenile Justice for the Commonwealth of Virginia, a statewide agency, where he was responsible for developing policy and providing administrative oversight for 38 regional offices and more than 110 local and state facilities.

Previously, he served as the Sheriff of Fairfax County (VA) for 10 years. He was elected to office three times beginning in 1990. As Sheriff he developed professional policies that received national and international recognition. He also introduced new technologies  to the criminal justice system.

Carl Peed is a family man and a resident of Oak Hill, Virginia. He has a Certificate of Criminal Justice Administration from the University of Virginia and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the National Institute of Corrections, and the National Sheriffs Institute. We are honored to have him as part of the Memorial Fund team.

If you would like to contribute to the Memorial Fund's efforts in your own way, please contact John Shanks at 202.737.8529 or JShanks@nleomf.org.

Saturday, June 9, 2012

Correctional Peace Officers Foundation Annual Memorial Ceremony

Earlier today, the Correctional Peace Officers Foundation held their Annual National Memorial Ceremony at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC, to honor the brave men and women working the corrections beat --often considered the toughest beat in the law enforcement, -- including nine officers killed in the line of duty in 2011.


There are now 585 names of correctional officers inscribed on the marble walls of the Memorial. The Memorial Service is part of CPOF’s Project 200 XXIII weekend, an annual four-day gathering for correctional officers and families. Project 200 XXIII weekend and also includes educational seminars, counseling sessions, activities for kids, and more.

Memorial Fund Chairman & CEO, Craig W. Floyd, gave brief remarks as part of the ceremony. He shared the stories of brave officers, such as Andrew Turner, who was killed on March 26, 1916. Officer Turner was fatality stabbed in the heart by an inmate at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in Kansas. He left behind a wife and two children.

Mr. Floyd concluded his remarks by thanking corrections officers for all they do to protect our communities. “You may not always hear the words, ‘thank you,’ nearly enough but your nation built a national monument here in your honor…Few professionals receive such a high honor, and few are so deserving.”

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

NASCAR Salutes Law Enforcement at Dover International Speedway®

On Sunday June 3, over 300 law enforcement officers and supporters attended the Fourth Annual Law Enforcement Appreciation Day at Dover International Speedway®, honoring all of America's law enforcement heroes and supporting the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund’s work. Event goers were treated to trackside tours, performances by bagpipers, and a Q&A appearance by driver David Gilliland of the No. 38 ModSpace Ford Fusion for Front Row Motorsports. Supporters then headed to the grandstands to take in the FedEx 400 benefitting Autism Speaks NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race.


During the pre-race ceremony Dover Motorsports® presented the Memorial Fund with a check for $2,800, raised via proceeds from a special “Law Enforcement Appreciation Day” ticket package offering. A $20 donation was made for every ticket package sold.

During the driver introductions on the track, Driver Carl Edwards was presented with the Memorial Fund Chairman’s Award. This award is presented annually by the Chairman, Craig W. Floyd, to a deserving individual or organization that has assisted the Memorial Fund in its work to honor the service and sacrifice of America’s law enforcement officers and has positively impacted the law enforcement profession. The Memorial Fund proudly presented this award to Carl Edwards, who has used his celebrity status and his role as a former reserve officer with the Boone County (MO) Sherriff’s Department to bring increased awareness to the work of nearly 800,000 men and women who serve and protect us every day.

After the Chairman’s Award presentation, Memorial Fund Director of Development & Law Enforcement Relations John Shanks, along with the Memorial Fund’s November 2010 Officer of the Month, Officer Raymond Blohm of the Upper Darby (PA) Police Department, and a young NASCAR fan and Memorial Fund supporter, joined Edwards for a lap around the Monster Mile prior to the race.

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador Spotlight: Sergeant Joe Flanagan, Alhambra (CA) Police Department

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.

This month we recognize Sergeant Joe Flanagan of the Alhambra (CA) Police Department, who has been a longtime friend and supporter of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and National Law Enforcement Museum. Joe serves on the Board of Directors for the Police Officers Research Association of California (PORAC) and is a past President of the Alhambra Police Officers Association. In 2008, Joe was instrumental in working with the Alhambra POA to donate $12,500 to the Museum campaign to fund a bench that will be located in the Main Concourse of the Museum and will bear the name 'Alhambra Police Officers Association.'

Alhambra (CA) Police Sergeant Joe Flanagan

As a Memorial Fund Ambassador, Joe takes his role very seriously and volunteers his time to help support our work. Additionally, every year for the past several years, Joe has organized groups of Alhambra officers and police department staff to attend National Police Week. This year’s Police Week was especially important to Joe and his fellow officers, as one of their own was honored. The Alhambra P.D. suffered a great loss on July 10, 2011, when Officer Ryan Embert Stringer died in the line of duty in an automobile crash.  

Sgt. Joe Flanagan is the ideal example of what it means to be a Law Enforcement Ambassador. Joe is a true friend and leader, who we are honored to have as part of the Memorial Fund team.

If you would like to contribute to the Memorial Fund's efforts in your own way, please contact John Shanks at 202.737.8529 or JShanks@nleomf.org.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Thank You, USA Today, for Honoring our Fallen Heroes

When it comes to honoring the memory of our nation’s fallen law enforcement heroes, the Gannett Co. gets it.

For the fourth year in a row, the company’s flagship newspaper, USA Today, has donated a quarter-page ad paying tribute to officers killed in the line of duty.

The ad, which appeared on page 5B of the May 14th edition, lists the names of all 163 officers who died in law enforcement service during 2011. And it reminds the family members, loved ones and colleagues of the fallen that a grateful nation will always remember these brave men and women.

Thank you, Gannett and USA Today, for honoring our heroes during National Police Week

Tuesday, May 15, 2012


In 1962, President Kennedy proclaimed May 15th as National Peace Officers Memorial Day and the calendar week in which May 15th falls, as National Police Week determining the dates for National Police Week 2012 — Sunday, May 13th through Saturday, May 19th.

At the conclusion of the 31st Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol, leaders of the Fraternal Order of Police, the FOP Auxiliary, Concerns of Police Survivors and the Memorial Fund brought the wreath from the Capitol to the Memorial to remain under the watch of honor guards from all over the country for the rest of the evening.

At midnight, a lone piper will walk through the Memorial, and the flags will be returned to full staff, signaling the end of Peace Officers Memorial Day.

Monday, May 14, 2012

18th Annual Emerald Society & Pipeband March and Service





Bagpipes trace their roots to the Middle East several centuries before the birth of Christ. But it was in Ireland and Scotland that the instrument became popular, used to signal a death and escort the fallen to the final resting place. Their strong association with law enforcement in the United States developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as Irish-Americans stepped forward and began to fill the growing ranks of our law enforcement agencies. One of the enduring traditions they brought with them was bagpipe music.

This annual service remembered all law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty, in particular officers of Gaelic descent.

Sunday, May 13, 2012

24th Annual Candlelight Vigil

Tonight, the nation paused to formally dedicate the names of 362 fallen law enforcement heroes, added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in 2012. Of the 362 names, 163 were officers killed in the line of duty during 2011 and 199 were names of officers previously undiscovered.


Secretary of Homeland Security, Janet Napolitano, and U.S. Attorney General, Eric H. Holder, Jr., delivered remarks. Attorney General Holder and Concerns of Police Survivors National President, Linda Moon Gregory, led the lighting of the candles.

Detective Brian Phillips, La Porte (IN) Police Department; Lieutenant Mavis Johnson, Baton Rouge (LA) Police Department; and Officer Bridget Sanchez, Miami-Dade (FL) Police Department, all performed moving musical tributes during the ceremony.

The national monument now contains the names of 19,660 fallen law enforcement officers—from all 50 states; the District of Columbia; U.S. territories; federal law enforcement, corrections, railroad and military police agencies—who have died in the performance of duty throughout U.S. history, dating back to the first known officer death in 1791.

Special thanks to Officer.com for providing a free webcast of tonight’s services.

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Police Unity Tour 2012

Shortly after 2 pm this afternoon, over 1400 members of the Police Unity Tour completed their long journey to Washington, DC. Participants traveled hundreds of miles the past three days—from six spokes in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

Friends, family and supporters gathered at the Memorial, waving signs and cheering on the participants as they finished the long ride.


After all riders had entered the Memorial, a brief ceremony was held, and Florham Park (NJ) Chief Patrick Montuore, founder of the Police Unity Tour, presented a check for $1.65 million to Craig W. Floyd, Chairman & CEO of the NLEOMF—the highest amount raised in the history of the Police Unity Tour.

The NLEOMF thanks all the members of the Police Unity Tour, who work tirelessly to ensure the service and sacrifice of America's law enforcement heroes are forever remembered. Their generosity, commitment, and unity are vital to honoring all 19,660 officers killed in the line of duty.

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Police Unity Tour to Arrive at National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial on Saturday, May 12th

This morning, members of the Police Unity Tour began their four day journey to Washington, DC—a solemn ride in honor of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. This year, over 1,400 participants of the Police Unity Tour will make their way to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

The Police Unity Tour is comprised of six “spokes” which leave from points in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Three spokes began their journey this morning and three will begin their ride tomorrow. The Tour’s six spokes will converge in Washington, DC on May 12th when they will ride into the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial at approximately 2:00 pm to the cheers of thousands of family, friends, colleagues and supporters.

Throughout their long voyage, Police Unity Tour members wear special remembrance bracelets that bear the name(s) of the officer(s) they ride for. Many members present the bracelets to surviving family members upon finishing the ride.

Along their routes, the Police Unity Tour will stop at Target® stores to further the group’s primary mission of raising awareness about law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Target® is a generous sponsor of the Police Unity Tour, and the Memorial Fund’s National Police Week events and activities are also supported, in part, by a generous contribution from Target®.

Follow the riders’ progress and view a few photos from the tour at www.facebook.com/nleomf and on twitter @nleomf.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

18th Annual Blue Mass


Today public safety and law enforcement officers from the Washington, DC metropolitan area converged at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, to honor and pray for law enforcement and fire safety officers killed in the line of duty and those currently serving today.


As representatives from Federal and local law enforcement and public safety agencies entered the church, they were flanked by honor guards and pipe and drum units.

Blue Mass began in 1934, when police officers gathered to pray for their fallen comrades and seek God's blessing for their own safety. The tradition stopped in the mid-1970s but has since resumed in grander fashion than ever. The name "Blue Mass" comes from the traditional color of many officers' uniforms.

The principal celebrant and homilist for the Blue Mass was His Eminence Donald Cardinal Wuerl.

Next up: Police Unity Tour Kick-off Ceremonies happening in New Jersey and Virginia.  For more information about National Police Week 2012, including a complete schedule of events, visit www.LawMemorial.org/PoliceWeek.

Monday, May 7, 2012

33rd Annual Washington Area Police Memorial Service

The Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) of Washington, DC, the Fraternal Order of Police DC Lodge #1, and the DC Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors hosted the 33rd Annual Washington Area Police Memorial Service at MPD’s Headquarters in downtown DC.

 

This annual service recognizes the service of all DC Metro area law enforcement officers. Special recognition was given to three officers, Sergeant Michael Boehm, United States Park Police; Officer William Torbit Jr., Baltimore City Police Department; and Trooper First Class Shaft Hunter who made the ultimate sacrifice in 2011.

Introductory remarks were given by Metropolitan Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier, followed by guest speakers Vincent Gray, Mayor of the District of Columbia and Janet Napolitano, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. Representatives from Baltimore City Police Department, the United States Park Police, and the Maryland State Police spoke about their officers lost in the past year, which was followed by a solemn roll call of fallen heroes from the DC Metro area.

As the names were read, survivors, law enforcement officers and friends placed blue roses along the edge of the fountain at the Washington Law Enforcement Memorial. As a special tribute, two helicopters, one from MPD and one from the US Park Police conducted a ceremonial fly-over at the end of the service.

The names of the three officers honored at the service today will be dedicated on the walls of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial at the 24th Annual Candlelight Vigil this Sunday, May 13th at 8:00 pm, along with 359 other officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice and whose names were added in 2012.

Next up: 18t Annual Blue Mass at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church. For more information about National Police Week 2012, including a complete schedule of events, visit www.LawMemorial.org/PoliceWeek.

Saturday, May 5, 2012

21st Annual Correctional Officers Wreath Laying Ceremony

Today, the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Corrections Chiefs Committee gathered at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial to honor correctional officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice—including seven correctional officers killed in 2011 and 21 fallen correctional officers from the DC metro area.


Every year since the Memorial was dedicated in October 1991, the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Corrections Chiefs Committee has conducted a ceremony at the Memorial honoring correctional officers from the DC Metropolitan region and around the nation for their service and sacrifice.  More than 500,000 brave men and women currently work so valiantly inside our prisons and jails, contributing to the safety of our community and nation.

This year’s ceremony included guest speakers Craig W. Floyd, Chairman & CEO of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, and Patrick A. Burke, Assistant Chief of the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, DC.

After brief remarks, the roll call of fallen heroes was solemnly read aloud, as members of the participating honor guards carried red roses to the center medallion of the Memorial. After each flower was placed, a single bell tolled. In a traditional symbolic gesture, white doves were released at the end of the ceremony, and a wreath was placed at the medallion.

Tomorrow marks the start of National Correctional Officers’ and Employees Week (May 6-12, 2012), which was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1984. Proclaiming the first-ever National Correctional Officers Week on May 5, 1984, President Reagan called “upon officials of State and local governments and the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.”

In 1996, Congress officially changed the name of the week to National Correctional Officers and Employees Week.  The names of 585 correctional officers are engraved on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial. These courageous heroes are forever remembered, and their light continues to shine through their memory, and through the selfless men and women who continue to serve each day.

The Correctional Peace Officer Foundation will hold a ceremony scheduled for June 8, 10:00 am at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Unveiling Day at the Memorial

Earlier today the name of Virginia Tech Police Officer Deriek Crouse was officially unveiled on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, along with the names of two other officers killed in the line of duty, Albany (GA) Police Officer Terry Mae Lewis-Flemming and Riverside (MO) Master Patrolman Jefferson Gerald Taylor.

Friends, family, and colleagues of Officer Crouse gathered to honor his service and sacrifice. Less than six months ago, Officer Crouse was shot and killed while he was administering a routine traffic stop on Virginia Tech's campus. He was 39-years old and left behind a wife, Tina, son, Dustin, and four step-children.

Officer Crouse formerly worked at the New River Valley Jail in Dublin, VA, the Montgomery County (VA) Sheriff’s Department and was a U.S. Army veteran.



In 2012, the names of 362 officers, including Officer Crouse, will be added to the Memorial walls, 163 names of officers killed in 2011 and 199 historical fatalities. All of the newly-engraved names will be formally dedicated on the Memorial during the 24th  Annual Candlelight Vigil on the evening of May 13, as part of the National Police Week observances.

News Coverage of Unveiling Day:
http://www.wjla.com/articles/2012/04/deriek-crouse-honored-75330.html 
http://www.wdbj7.com/news/wdbj7-slain-virginia-tech-police-officers-name-added-to-national-memorial-20120426,0,219734.story
http://www.roanoke.com/news/breaking/wb/307996

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador Spotlight: Corporal Cory Eslick, Anne Arundel County (MD) Police Department

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.

This month we introduce you to Law Enforcement Ambassador Cory Eslick, a longtime supporter and friend of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. When he started visiting the Memorial early in his law enforcement career, Cory really started to grasp the significance of honoring the men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

Law Enforcement Ambassador, Corporal Cory Eslick, Anne Arundel County (MD) Police Department
Embracing the Memorial Fund’s efforts to raise awareness about the enormous contributions of law enforcement officers everywhere, Cory reached out to the Maryland Department of Motor Vehicles to begin to create a Maryland State License Plate bearing the Memorial Fund’s Rose & Shield logo. Today you can see vehicles all across the DC Metropolitan area with these special commemorative license plates. In addition to raising awareness and appreciation for America’s peace officers and the Memorial Fund, Cory’s program has generated more than $2,000 in donations.

Special Memorial Fund-branded Maryland License Plate

Cory is a great example of someone who seized the opportunity to help make a difference. We hope more supporters will follow his lead and get involved with the Memorial Fund’s efforts. And we thank Cory for his strong leadership and vision.

If you would like to contribute to the Memorial Fund's efforts in your own way, please contact John Shanks at 202.737.8529 or JShanks@nleomf.org.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Law Enforcement Guardian Spotlight: Elisa Santos

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.

This month we introduce you to National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Guardian, Elisa Santos. Elisa and her husband, Colorado Springs Police Officer Isidro “Sid” Santos, are very active members of their community. In addition, Elisa has been an active member of the Memorial Fund’s Ambassador/Guardian program for the past four years. While she is not a law enforcement officer herself, Elisa is passionate about supporting the Memorial Fund and helping raise funds and awareness about the A Matter of Honor campaign to build the National Law Enforcement Museum, making her a perfect fit for the Guardian program.

Museum Guardian, Elisa Santos

When the Memorial Fund announced its efforts to join with major league sports teams for Law Enforcement Appreciation Events, Elisa immediately called and asked how she could help. There is not a major league sporting venue in Colorado Springs, but there is a minor league professional baseball team—the Colorado Sky Sox—and Elisa reached out to them to organize a Law Enforcement Appreciation Event to be held on May 6, 2012.

Elisa is a strong leader and dedicated volunteer. The Memorial Fund values her leadership and vision to the cause of honoring the service and sacrifice of our men and women in law enforcement.

If you would like to learn how you can organize a local sporting event to support the Memorial Fund and Museum, please contact John Shanks at 202.737.8529 or JShanks@nleomf.org. The Memorial Fund highly encourages our supporters to find your nearest Law Enforcement Appreciation Event and go to show your support. Hope to see you at an upcoming game!

Monday, March 5, 2012

Gearing up for National Police Week: Finalizing the Names

With about two months to go until National Police Week, the Memorial Fund’s Research Department has reached a crucial point for this year's engraving —they have tested the proof of the names laid out on the Memorial walls and made final changes to the placement.

Adding the names of fallen officers onto the Memorial is a process that starts long before names are engraved in the spring and formally dedicated on May 13th at the annual Candlelight Vigil. The Memorial Fund’s Research Department works year-round collecting records, running reports and intricately reviewing and approving names, leading up to Police Week.

After several meetings of the Memorial Fund’s Names Committee, comprised of representatives from the Board of Directors, the final list of names that will be engraved is sent to a type setter and to our engravers, who provide proofs of the names which are double and triple checked for spelling errors.



Research takes the proofs to the Memorial, to ensure the names fit on each of the panels on the east and west sides of the Memorial walls. Names of the officers are in no set order on the Memorial; placement generally depends on the length of a name and how it fits onto the width of the panel.

Last year, the engraving process was modified to improve the product of each name engraved.  The new process is more complex and requires that after each panel is engraved, it is stained twice and then allowed to cure for at least 72 hours (weather permitting). The panels cannot be exposed to the elements, nor can names be etched onto paper until the panel is completely cured.

When engraving begins in April, visit www.LawMemorial.org for updates on any potential panel or wall closures before visiting the Memorial.  The Memorial Fund apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause our visitors.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador Spotlight: Brent Clark

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund enjoys the support of a special group of volunteers: Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies, while Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers, allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.


This month, we honor Law Enforcement Ambassador Brent Clark, who has been an Ambassador for the past four years. Not only has Brent volunteered countless hours during National Police Week and throughout the year, he works closely with our staff to coordinate our Law Enforcement Appreciation events with professional sports teams across the country.


Brent Clark with Vincent D’Onofrio at 2011 Ambassador Reception
Brent is an active federal law enforcement agent. Originally from Michigan, he has been assigned to the New York City area, but is currently back in Michigan on special assignment. Brent not only volunteers his personal time and energy to support the mission of the Memorial Fund and Museum, he is also a personal donor to the “A Matter of Honor” Campaign to build the National Law Enforcement Museum.

Brent has volunteered countless hours outside of National Police Week and was responsible for making the November 2011 – Detroit Red Wings Law Enforcement Appreciation Night a great success. Brent worked closely with Memorial Fund staff, the Detroit Red Wings and Michigan law enforcement to organize the event, which raised over $18,000 for the Museum campaign.

Brent is currently working with the Detroit Tigers to organize another Law Enforcement Appreciation Night which will be held on April 19, 2012 at Comerica Park. Ten dollars of every Law Enforcement Appreciation Night ticket will be donated to the Museum campaign and ticket buyers will receive a limited edition Memorial Fund/Detroit Tigers challenge coin.

Brent Clark was also instrumental in helping the Museum acquire a steel beam from the World Trade Center after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He is an honored member of the Memorial Fund’s extended family and we recognize, with gratitude, his service and leadership to our country and our organization.

Interested in becoming an Ambassador/Guardian? Visit http://www.nleomf.org/contribute/ambassadors/.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Law Enforcement Ambassador Spotlight: D. Michael Kruggel

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund is comprised of a special group of volunteers:   Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Law Enforcement Ambassadors are active and retired law enforcement officers from city, state, federal and military law enforcement agencies. Law Enforcement Guardians are volunteers who support and honor law enforcement but are not sworn officers,  allowing citizens, family members and corporate supporters to work closely with the Memorial Fund in achieving their goals.

This blog is the first in a new series designed to highlight the many contributions of our Law Enforcement Ambassadors and Guardians. Interested in becoming an Ambassador/Guardian? Visit http://www.nleomf.org/contribute/ambassadors/.

This month, we honor Law Enforcement Ambassador D. Michael (Mike) Kruggel, who has been an Ambassador for the past four years.  Not only has Mike volunteered countless hours during National Police Week and throughout the year, he has also recruited his two sons, Jason and Michael, as volunteers. 

Mike is a retired police officer from southern California who now resides in Tennessee.  He is the Founder and CEO of the Office of Special Investigations, LLC, a provider of investigation services throughout the United States and a $25,000 donor to the “A Matter of Honor” Campaign to build the National Law Enforcement Museum.
Craig W. Floyd, Chairman & CEO of the Memorial Fund with Ambassador Mike Kruggel and his son.
Mike’s volunteer leadership spans the entire year, frequently stopping by the Memorial offices to lend a hand.  During National Police Week, Mike and his sons can be found at the Memorial helping surviving family members and officers find names on the wall or assisting customers and stocking shelves at the Retail Center. 

Mike Kruggel is an honored member of the Memorial Fund’s extended family and we recognize, with gratitude, his service and leadership to our organization.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

In Memory of K-9 Maggie Sheridan, Louisa County (VA) Sheriff's Office

In December 2011, K-9 Maggie Sheridan, an American Kennel Club registered black and tan Bloodhound of the Louisa County (VA) Sheriff's Office, was killed while tracking a suicidal subject. As she neared the suspect's home, a pit bull attacked and bit her; she later died as a result of an infection from the bites.

Maggie's handler, Lt. Patrick Sheridan said, "Maggie was a gem. It takes a lot of training and the right handler, but the results and the benefits of that are just priceless."

According to The Charlottesville NewsPlex, Maggie worked a total of 348 cases in her career. Below is a special tribute video in Maggie's honor.


Visit the tribute page devoted to Maggie on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/In-Memory-of-LCSO-K-9-Maggie/252842458111355