Thursday, October 20, 2016

Memorial Commemorates 25th Anniversary with FBI National Academy

Dressed in the standard khaki cargo pants and green polo shirts, the members of the 266th Session of the FBI National Academy walked among walls of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial on Wednesday night. As the sun started to set, they kneeled by the 20,789 names. Some sat nearby in silence, others etched names they recognized onto paper.

The officers looked across E Street at the wide 30-foot hole in the ground, part of the construction that will eventually become the National Law Enforcement Museum. They talk about making a trip back to Washington, DC, in mid-2018, when the Museum is slated to open.

The FBI’s Jeffery S. McCormick started the wreathlaying ceremony with the introduction, welcoming the 266th Session to the Memorial. The presentation of colors was provided by the Alexandria (VA) Police Department.

Memorial Fund President and CEO Craig W. Floyd was happy to have the members of the National Academy at the Memorial this week.

“Tonight you help us commemorate a very special milestone in law enforcement history,” he said. “It was 25 years ago this past Saturday, on October 15, 1991, when we dedicated this majestic monument that was built to honor the men and women in law enforcement. To honor our service, remember those who have sacrificed their lives in the performance of duty.”

Mr. Floyd took a few minutes to share the history of the Memorial, how it was built and the special significance of Judiciary Square, where the Memorial, and soon the Museum, stands.

“It was in 1972 when a detective from Suffolk County in New York, by the name of Donald Guilford, had the vision to build a national law enforcement officers memorial. And he took that to his local Congressman, and they introduced a bill. Language for some time, but ultimately they went to a leader among law enforcement. His name was Mario Biaggi, a Congressman from New York City. He had served for 23 years with the New York City Police Department. A legendary figure, he was wounded 10 times in the line of duty, the most decorated officer in New York City history when he retired in 1965. He served 20 years in Congress, and he always said one of his proudest, if not the proudest, achievement he ever had was the establishment of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

“He introduced the legislation, became law in 1984. And after seven years of dedicated effort, we opened this monument to the public. It wasn’t easy. It took us two years to pick the specific site it should be built on. Congress didn’t legislate that. So we scoured the city, and we came upon Judiciary Square, where we’re standing here tonight. They say that President George Washington once stood in this very place. He decided that this Judiciary Square would become the seat of our judicial branch of government, the seat of criminal justice in America. It’s one of the three major spaces they designed Washington around. We felt that this was the spot to honor the men and women who enforce the laws of our nation, and keep the peace.

“So in 1991, when we dedicated this memorial, there were 12,561 names added to these Memorial walls. It was a Herculean task to identify those fallen heroes. It’s never been done before. We were the first.”

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Minnesota Wild Supports Law Enforcement at Special Game

On Tuesday night, the Minnesota Wild held their annual law enforcement night to honor and recognize Minnesota Law Enforcement.

The Wild battled the Los Angeles Kings in an exciting game where the Wild came out on top in a final score of 6-3.

This special night benefited the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, and each fan that purchased a discounted ticket through the special offer received a co-branded Minnesota Wild and Memorial Fund rally towel and were treated to a pregame party.

Prior to the game, law enforcement friends, family and supporters gathered on the ice for a photo.

The next Minnesota Wild law enforcement night will take place in early 2017. For other law enforcement night events with NHL teams across the country visit

We salute the Minnesota Wild on supporting the thin blue line. Good luck this season!

Monday, September 19, 2016

Law Enforcement Recognized Throughout Major League Baseball

On Saturday, September 17, the Cleveland Indians brought their entire "Tribe" out as the Indians battled the Detroit Tigers in extra innings as they continue to fight for the playoffs and a chance to win the American League Central. The Indians won 1-0.

Not only was it a big win for the "Tribe" but it was a special win for law enforcement as the Indians held their annual Law Enforcement Night at Progressive Field.

Before the game started, a moment of silence was held in honor of Ohio State Trooper Kenneth Velez who was struck and killed by a vehicle while conducting a traffic stop in Cleveland on September 15. Trooper Velez is the seventh officer to be struck and killed in 2016 and the fourth law enforcement fatality for the state of Ohio.

The National Anthem was performed by Sergeant Michael Maughmer of the Ohio State Highway Patrol as the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department Honor Guard presented the colors.

Throwing out the first pitch (which was a strike) and representing Federal Law Enforcement was Ohio native and current United States Marshal of the Northern District of Ohio Peter Elliott.

Despite the overcast weather, 26,654 were attendance to witness a great game and a great night supporting law enforcement, which raised over $2,700 for the Memorial Fund.

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund would like to thank JP Makari and the Group Sales Team, Cleveland Indians Community Impact Team, Bill Swank, Ohio Chiefs of Police Association, Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association Cleveland Chapter and the Ohio Fraternal Order of Police for their support and making it a great event.

Also around the league, Texas Rangers also hosted Law Enforcement Night on Saturday, honoring our August 2016 Officer of the Month Award winners Ed Pietrowski and Michael Sarro. This event was held in partnership with the Texas Rangers and the Police Officers Angel Foundation. Special thanks to Maria Alvarado and Zak Ganter.

For the latest law enforcement sporting events, visit

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Twin Cities Honor Law Enforcement on 9-11 Anniversary

The afternoon game on Sunday, Sept. 11, was a day to remember in the Twin Cities as the Minnesota Twins and the Cleveland Indians honored and recognized Minnesota law enforcement and paid tribute to those who died on the 15th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. Great weather was on hand as more than 20,300 were in attendance for Law Enforcement Appreciation Day.

Before the game, representatives from the Minnesota Law Enforcement Memorial Association, Minnesota Sheriffs Association and the Concerns of Police Survivors’ (C.O.P.S.) Minnesota Chapter gathered at home plate as the St. Paul Police Department Honor Guard presented the colors during the national anthem. The Minnesota Twins Territory Flag was raised and saluted by the Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association’s Minnesota Chapter.

The Minnesota Twins salute law enforcement and thank everyone for attending and supporting the annual event. The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund would like to give special thanks to Luis Breazeal and Sam Henschen and to the Minnesota Chiefs of Police Association for going above and beyond and making this a great event.

Other NLEOMF events that took place on Sunday, Sept. 11, included games with the New York Yankees and the Houston Astros. For the latest in law enforcement appreciation sporting events visit

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Kansas City Honors Law Enforcement

On Monday, July 18, the Kansas City Royals and Major League Baseball teamed up with the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund as they hosted the annual Law Enforcement Night at the "K" as the World Series Champions Kansas City Royals battled the Cleveland Indians. The Royals beat the Indians in a final score of 7-3. 

More than 38,000 were in attendance on this special night which gave the general public along with family and friends to come out to the "K" and honor and thank law enforcement.

The Royals' support for police took on extra significance that evening in wake of recent shootings in Dallas and Baton Rouge. Slain Kansas City (KS) Police Detective Brad Lancaster was also honored by the Kansas City Royals. Detective Lancaster was killed in the line of duty earlier this year helping other officers respond to a suspicious person near the Kansas Speedway.  

Detective Lancaster daughters threw out the first pitch as Kansas City Police Officer Dustin Dierenfeldts sang the National Anthem.

Royals manager Ned Yost says he has a deep respect for the officers who work at Kauffman Stadium and on the streets. 

"We know how important they are to everybody's safety," Yost said before the game. "To continue to find ways and to support them for what they do. They are very important to this community and every community." 

Our thanks goes out to all the law enforcement officers and the Royals fans that attended, special thanks to Royals Group Sales Representative Ariel Peralta and Community Relations Director Ben Aken. For the latest on law enforcement sporting events visit

Monday, May 16, 2016

Washington Nationals Host Law Enforcement Night

In the second game of a doubleheader, the Washington Nationals hosted law enforcement officers, their families and supporters on Saturday, May 14, 2016. Anne Arundel County State Attorney W‎es Adams joined Police Unity Tour members Maggie Deboard, Tim Benedict and Karen Bonz on the field for a pre-game ceremony.

Law Enforcement Appreciation Night with the Nationals

Friday, May 13, 2016

Police Unity Tour 2016

Shortly after 2 pm today, over 2,000 members of the Police Unity Tour completed their long journey to Washington, DC. Participants traveled hundreds of miles over the past three days to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

Friends, family and supporters gathered at the Memorial, waving signs and cheering on the participants as they finished the long ride. The Police Unity Tour’s motto is “We Ride for Those Who Died” and is one that each rider seriously embraces. Participants not only trained hard for the 300 mile average ride but also raised money to provide awareness and financial support for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.

After all riders had entered the Memorial, a brief ceremony was held, and the Police Unity Tour presented a check for $2.32 million to Craig W. Floyd, President & CEO of the the Memorial Fund.

We thank all the members of the Police Unity Tour, who worked tirelessly to ensure the service and sacrifice of America's law enforcement heroes are forever remembered. Their generosity, commitment and unity are vital to honoring all officers killed in the line of duty.